Friday, January 5, 2018

Crocheted Dish Scrubbies

I scrub pots and pans with a nylon scrubby instead of a sponge. The latter gets mildewed too easily (pee-yoo!), whereas a nylon scrubby dries fast. But sometimes they’re hard to find. Homemade dish scrubbies to the rescue!

This is my easy crochet pattern for a dish scrubby made from nylon net. There are lots of scrubby patterns out there, but none that I could find that were rectangular and single-layer. I like the rectangular shape because it can really get into corners of pans. I like a single layer scrubby because it's easier to rinse. . . and it's a lot faster to make.:-)

For one 3 X 4 inch scrubby:


  • ½ yard of 72” wide nylon netting
  • Size K (6.5mm) crochet hook

For the most recent scrubbies I made, I got the netting from Joann Fabrics. They have a USA-made version with large holes for a regular price of $1.49 per yard. At our local store, it was labeled “tulle” which I think is a misnomer because tulle is the tiny-holed fabric you use to make a graceful, soft, bridal veil. Tulle is too fragile for a dish scrubby. Netting is sturdier. Here’s a picture of some of the netting I bought next to a tape measure for scale so you can see how big the holes are in the fabric:
Pretty big holes. I'd call this netting.

Six steps to make a crocheted dish scrubby:


It took me 45 minutes to 3 hours to make each scrubby, from cutting strips to weaving in the final tail. That 3 hour scrubby was an anomaly: I tore the netting when tying knots. (Don’t pull so hard!) I lost sight of the stitches and had to unravel until I could see them again . . . and again, whew! Other than THAT one, I’d say the average scrubby took about an hour.

  1. Cut netting width-wise across the fabric into six 2.5” wide strips.
  2. Taper the ends of each strip so the knots you’re about to tie won’t be so bulky. Tie strips together with a square knot, leaving tails about 2 inches long. Use a square knot rather than an overhand knot so the tails will be pointing in opposite directions (makes it easier to weave in the ends). My favorite crochet join is a Russian join, but that’s darn impossible with netting. It’s sticky and persnickety when you work with it.
  3. Loosely chain 10. Turn.
  4. For the next 7 rows: Chain one then single crochet in each of the 10 stitches from the previous row. Don’t let your stitches get too tight because the netting isn’t slippery at all, and you’ll drive yourself nuts trying to work with it. When you come across a join where you’ve tied a knot, tuck and weave in the tails as you crochet along.
  5. Slip stitch around the perimeter of the scrubby, one slip stitch in each stitch and in each row on the sides, and two slip stitches in each corner.
  6. Weave in the final tail end (and the tail of the very beginning if you didn’t already tuck it in while crocheting). Netting isn’t a yarn, of course, so stray edges may poke up here and there. If there are any stray edges that look unsightly, simply trim them off. And you’re done!

All finished and ready for scrubbing!

Make this day even better. Consider:


  • When we lived in town, the church we attended stored the fully decorated Christmas tree in a basement closet. A large sheet of plastic kept dust from collecting on the tree. I learned that my then-boss and his wife also stored their tree fully decorated. They simply carried it up into the attic. And here we were spending HOURS decorating and undecorating our tree. Now we simply poke our tree into a spare bedroom closet. This past Monday I asked Dear Husband to time how long it took me to “take down the tree” and store it away. It took all of 63 seconds.:-)

Already decorated and ready for next Christmas!


24 comments:

  1. These sound indeed better than sponges. One day I'll make theses after I learn how to crochet. :)
    I put my sponges in a small bowl of vinegar and then put in the microwave for one minute. Squeeze vinegar once it's cooled. That keeps mildew away.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I never thought of using vinegar and the microwave to clean kitchen sponges. Good to know. Thanks for commenting, Nil!

      Delete
  2. That is a great idea about the tree if you have room. I have a free blog too. Suits me.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know you have a free blog. It's great. Your blog is what inspired me to try making soap. Haven't done it yet, but I'm going to! Thanks for stopping by.:-)

      Delete
  3. I like your new blog format.
    Have you ever used those plastic wire bags that onions come in from the grocery store to make a scrubby? I like the idea of using the netting. And the instructions look easy enough for me.
    Linda

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I tried using a bag that fruit came in, and it didn't work. The plastic kept breaking. It was either too fragile to begin with, or the little bumps where each strand of plastic met with another were getting caught and creating a stress point. I haven't bought a whole bag of onions in, like forever, so I don't know if onion bags have those same bumps or if they are smooth netting.

      I'm glad you like the new blog format. I'm thrilled that it's free. I haven't quite got the comments section figured out (e.g., you had to post as Anonymous and put your name in the body of the comment), but maybe I will with time. Thanks for stopping by!

      Delete
  4. Welcome to Blogspot! I have been on blogspot since 2009. Cute scrubbies.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Retired Knitter. I bet you've KNITTED a few dish scrubbies before. Glad you stopped by.:-)

      Delete
  5. I enjoy your blog and am glad you decided to make the switch rather than give the whole thing up. Happy 2018!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, TAC, and happy 2018 to you, too!

      Delete
  6. Phew! Glad you’re still blogging, and blogging without paying for internet space is a win in my book! Does this mean there is no “subscribe” button, or maybe I haven’t found it yet. Super cute scrubbies. Looks like some of my homebody friends will be getting kitchen cleaning tools for their birthdays this year!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. There should be an email subscription box on the upper right side ("Get notified when a new...."). Hmm, I don't know where it's placed if you're reading this on a smart phone.

      Thanks on the scrubbies.:-)

      Delete
  7. I'm delighted you found a way to keep sharing your blog with us. Congratulations on the new site!

    ReplyDelete
  8. I've never commented on your blog before, but I wanted to say how much I enjoy it and that I'm very glad you're continuing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That's so nice of you to say, Kari, thanks!

      Delete
  9. Hey, that's a great idea! Scrubbies really are the best thing for washing dishes. I've never tried to make my own, though...

    And I just have to say, I LOVE the look of this place! It's really pretty! :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yay, glad you like the look, thanks!

      Delete
  10. We store our tree fully decorated as well. Got the idea from my Dad. First I made fun of him for being lazy, then realized it was a great idea. Hope you'll still be doing minimalist posts, that's what drew me to your blog though I do enjoy your craft posts too. I never realized blogs cost so much. Kudos to you for going frugal!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yep, I'll still do minimalist posts. Can't help it since I have so many minimalist tendencies! Being frugal is fun.:-) Thanks for commenting!

      Delete
  11. Loving your new blog, Priscilla. Is the background your own art work? It's very pretty!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Rachel! Can you believe the background is one of the standard, free backgrounds from Blogger? It looks exactly like something I'd do!

      Delete
  12. I have a friend who knits scrubbies with the netting because it relaxes her - I am one of the only people that likes using them so I get most of them - I LOVE them!!!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. The scrubbies are quite useful! Thanks for commenting, Sue!

      Delete

Commenters are awesome! (Be awesome.)